Camp GLOW 2013

7 05 2013

Last weekend was the third annual Camp GLOW in Siem Reap. Sixty-three students from seven secondary schools came to learn about women’s health and empowerment at this four-day workshop. I can’t say enough wonderful things about GLOW – it really is one of my favorite Peace Corps activities.

This year’s t-shirt design

You might remember from last year that Camp GLOW (Girls Leading Our World) is a project carried out by Peace Corps volunteers across the globe. It’s an opportunity to bring girls together from different communities to share their experiences and build their leadership capacity. Like last year, the camp was funded primarily through USAID’s Small Project Assistance fund, with help from each of the participating communities. However, this year the project grew in size – from 39 girls from three schools to 63 students from seven schools. I brought 11 girls from my site, all of whom had been actively involved in my weekly health club.

Posing with some of the girls

Posing with some of the girls

Our philosophy with Camp GLOW has always been to bring in competent, inspiring Khmer women to lead the sessions, and this year was no different. The first two days of the camp were led by the staff at Our Strength, who focused on sexual health and healthy relationships. The Women’s Resource Center joined us again this year as well, leading activities on self-awareness, goal setting, and community education. There was one new addition to the line-up this year though, as we asked students from the Royal University of Phnom Penh to lead a 4-hour session on career planning.

What does it take to be a good teacher?

In addition to the education sessions, there were plenty of fun activities to keep the girls engaged, including a newspaper fashion show, a pizza party, and a trip to Angkor Wat.

Making a traditional Cambodian outfit out of newspaper

Making a traditional Cambodian outfit out of newspaper

Cute nas

Cute nas

Now that the camp is finished, each group of girls is planning to teach 100 community members about what they learned at GLOW. Having seen the way that my girls organized and led the domestic violence education event for nearly 500 people in March, I feel confident that they will do a great job passing on what they’ve learned. Even on the van ride home from the camp, the girls were fearlessly teaching the other passengers about menstruation and reproductive anatomy.

For more pictures of GLOW, click here.

Katie





Tim’s Index Debut!

27 02 2013

Tim took a turn writing an article for my hometown paper, The Index. It was printed in this week’s edition, but you can also check it out below.

Education has no doubt been on the minds of many in Homer over the past couple months with the opening of the new Homer High School. The new environment, technology, and facilities are certainly exciting for students and teachers alike. With these changes in mind, it seems relevant to share our experience with schools here in Cambodia.

In Cambodia, the school system is still trying to bounce back from the devastating effects of the Khmer Rouge. After the systematic killing of educated Cambodians in the late 1970s, the reestablishment of public schools proved to be difficult. Villagers became teachers with no specialized training and often less than a high school diploma. With a storage closet full of weapons and ammunition, the teachers held classes in the mornings and defended the town from Khmer Rouge raids at night. This continued in our area until approximately 1995 when the remnants of the Khmer Rouge fled further west toward Thailand.

 

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Eighteen years later, the Cambodian school system has improved at a breakneck pace. New high school teachers are required to have completed either a 2 year teaching program or a 4 year bachelor’s degree. Additional schools are being built regularly, school libraries are flourishing thanks to international NGO (non-governmental organization) support, and professional development for teachers is on the rise. It is truly remarkable how far the school system has come considering all the work and money needed to completely rebuild it nationwide.

This fact is often cited at the local high school where I teach 9th, 10th, and 11th grades as a Peace Corps volunteer. My job here is to teach collaboratively with the English language teachers, helping them improve their English and to better develop student-centered techniques. Cambodian culture holds authority figures such as teachers in very high regard so many classes consist of a teacher lecturing for two hours with little student input. In all classes, but especially in English, this isn’t an effective method.

Culturally, teaching in a Cambodian classroom looks very different from Homer High. Uniformed students stand up for teachers as the instructor enters the class, when they are asked questions, and when teachers leave the class. If students need to ask permission from a teacher or if they come to class late, they politely raise their hands to their chin in a praying position and ask for forgiveness. When students walk near teachers outside of class, they will lower their heads to show respect. Showing respect in these ways is hugely important and students never fail to follow these customs.

 

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Overall, students are very motivated to learn. Many financially-able students attend private classes in addition to public school, making for a 12-13 hour school day. Students in our area also travel up to 25 miles to attend high school, since many areas still do not a school available. These students generally stay in a shared house near the school with 25 other people, all sleeping on the floor. Public school is technically free, but families must pay for uniforms, transportation, food, and monthly exams. For this reason, many students from poorer families drop out of school after 9th grade due to financial constraints. Adding that the consensus that public school is largely ineffective due to large class sizes (50:1) or absent teachers, the dropout rate is staggering. It is simply not expected for Khmer teenagers to study beyond the 9th grade in many villages.

The physical environment of the local high school can also prove challenging. There are six classroom buildings for the 1250 students between 7-12 grades. Although there are some newer classrooms with ceiling fans, and a quickly aging computer lab, there is no electricity to run these items. Each classroom is filled with wooden desks for 40-50 students and a large blackboard. The buildings themselves are relatively open in order to make studying tolerable in the Cambodian heat. The open windows and cement walls make noise a constant issue, especially with younger students. In the back of the school there is a small pond and a plot of land for the students to plant corn for their class in agriculture.

As any teacher knows, being in the classroom is both frustrating and inspirational. It has been rewarding over the past year and a half to see my co-teachers become better instructors despite the challenges facing them, and the students have been inspiring models of perseverance through their desire to learn and make a better life for themselves.

-Tim





Celebrating the Highlights of 2012

31 12 2012

This year was the first full calendar year that I’ve spent outside of the US, so it comes as no surprise that there is much to celebrate about 2012.

January: In a Phnom Penh deli with AM

January: In a Phnom Penh deli with AM

A Special Visitor

The year started off with a visit from one of my dearest friends from home: Anne Marie. We spent a week or so hitting the major Cambodian cities, but the best part of all was definitely just spending time with her. It was a great start to what ended up being an equally great year.

April: Hanging out on Halong Bay

April: Hanging out on Halong Bay

Trip to Vietnam

During Khmer New Year in April, Tim and I headed off to Vietnam for three weeks of vacation. We made our way from Ho Chi Minh City to Hanoi, stopping along the way to see the hills of Dalat, the beaches of Nha Trang, the colonial architecture of Hoi An, and the caves of Dong Hoi.

September: Tim's hospitality students at a hotel in Siem Reap

July: Tim begins working on his hospitality project with this great group of young people

Hospitality Training Begins

With the support of a local NGO and all of you, Tim began managing an intensive hospitality training program for disadvantaged youth in the community. It was the perfect opportunity to combine Tim’s interest in cooking, available NGO resources and a expressed need in the community.

July: The current group of volunteers welcomes the newbies at the airport

July: The current group of volunteers welcomes the newbies at the airport

Welcoming the K6s

A milestone for those of us who had reached the one year mark, welcoming the new group of volunteers to Cambodia reminded us all of how much we had learned and how far we had come since arriving the year before.

August: Teaching project volunteers about childhood nutrition

August: Teaching project volunteers about childhood nutrition

Understanding and Embracing my Role

In August, my project work took off, helping me to see the results of all the hard work I had put in during the first year of service. In the course of a month, I took the girls from my health club to Camp GLOW in Siem Reap, I helped organize and lead a training that would kick off a childhood nutrition program, I started teaching “the monsters” and I got to share some of what I learned with the new volunteers at their training.

October: Visiting the beach town of Sihanoukville

October: Visiting the beach town of Sihanoukville

Hitting the Beach

For our second Pchum Ben, Tim and I decided to take a quick trip down south to visit the relaxed towns of Kampot and Sihanoukville.

October: back to school

October: Back to school

A Second School Year

Immediately following our trip down south, Tim’s second academic year at site began, giving him the opportunity to once again work in the public schools with his choice of counterparts. He was especially excited this year because he knew what to expect and had already developed deep friendships with several teachers at the school.

November: Seeing my parents for the first time in 16 months

November: Seeing my parents for the first time in 16 months

My Parents’ Trip

In November, my parents came to visit and we spent ten days hitting all of the tourist activities in Siem Reap, including the alligator farm, the silk farm, Apsara dancing, the floating villages, the Angkor National Museum, the ceramics center and, of course, the temples.

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December: Ringing in the new year in style

The End of 2012

Here we are at the end of the year! Tim and I are celebrating all of the triumphs (and challenges) of 2012 in style in Siem Reap.

Thanks for all of the support and love this year. Wishing everyone a great 2013!

Katie





Back to School

1 10 2012

Happy October! Today is officially the first day of the academic year, which means all of the students line up for a procession to the school. Knowing this was the case, I took my camera along with me to breakfast so I could get a couple videos of the ritual.

First, have a look at what I was eating. Yum! Pork and rice. My usual breakfast if I get up in time.

Then, check out the videos. (Prepare yourself for some top-notch narration.)

But, be warned, just because today is the first day of school doesn’t mean that classes start. As I was telling my parents on the phone this morning, it’s typical for students and teachers to come to school every day for weeks before classes actually begin. It may be a while before the teachers get their schedules – and the drive to get in the classroom and start teaching. Until then, both the students and the teachers will come to the school everyday, but the students will sit in the classrooms while the teachers sit in the teachers’ lounge – the two groups never to meet.

Katie





Reflections on Cambodia: Year One

17 07 2012

 As we near the one year mark of service in Cambodia, I’ve spent a fair amount of time processing the experience. As the days and months pass, I simultaneously seem to understand more and less about the complexities of this country and its fragile future. Although I could never speak with any authority on what Cambodia truly is, I’ve put together the following list of things Cambodia has become to me. I hope it provides insight into this place and the twelve life-changing months I’ve spent here.

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Cambodia is a friendly smile and a nervous laugh. A “hello,” shouted from the rice paddies. It’s the hushed murmur of “barang” as you pass by, and the demanding “Moak bee na?” from a stranger. Cambodia is a string of small children chasing your bike. And a moto driver who stops to stare.

Cambodia is the smell of urine. Of fermented fish and rotting meat. It’s vomit on a long bus ride or the oniony scent of the country’s most beloved fruit. It’s incense burning near a spirit house.

Cambodia is pork with rice. Soup with rice. Noodles with rice. Cambodia is rice with rice.

Cambodia is the sound of roosters in the mornings and dogs at night. The monks’ rhythmic chanting drifting from the wat. It’s the discordant sounds of a wedding or a funeral. Dishes clinking next door or a baby crying. Cambodia is Pitbull and K*Pop, Karaoke and Prom Manh. It’s that same female voice, shrill and submissive, blaring from the TV. Cambodia is the deafening sound of a monsoon falling on the roof. And it’s a silence, a devastating silence, when voices should be heard.

Cambodia is the one glass eye watching everything you do.

Cambodia is emerald fields and killing fields. Disappearing forests and lakes filled with dirt. It’s a flood that ruins the crops. Cambodia is border wars and broken promises. It’s a billion dollars of aid and discouraging results.

Cambodia is 3,000 NGOs. It’s expats in coffee shops and sexpats in brothels. It’s bodyguards in the most exclusive of night clubs. It’s flocks of tourists, “Tuk tuk, lady,” and markets filled with cheap souvenirs. Cambodia is children begging on the streets. Amputees and orphans. It’s mediocre Western food.

Cambodia is its history. Cambodia is Angkor Wat.

Cambodia is a delicate balance of optimism and fatalism. It’s stories of the Khmer Rouge told in a whisper. It’s cheap beer and men who can’t hold their liquor. Cambodia is rovul taking afternoon naps in hammocks and sipping iced coffee on red plastic stools.

Cambodia is whitening creams and painted nails. Bright colored shirts adorned with lace and beads. It’s flexible fingers stretching backward, feet shuffling as music plays. It’s orange robes or bare bellies. Sampots and collared shirts, or tight tops and miniskirts.

It’s traffic and trafficking. Five on a moto and a truck piled high. It’s tai chi as you cross the street. It’s hanging on for dear life.

Cambodia is bats and spiders, snakes and mice. So many damn mice. It’s monkeys and elephants, lizards and butterflies. It’s plankton that glow in the dark.

It’s protractors and white out. Perfectly straight lines and meticulously taken notes. A sea of blue and white as children parade to school. Cambodia is a head ducked with respect, a face that’s been saved. Cambodia is so many vowels that all sound the same.

It’s squat toilets and no toilet paper. Stilted houses and burning trash. It’s life in a garbage dump, in its most literal sense. Cambodia is open defecation. It’s polluted rivers and a toxic lake.

Cambodia is rice farmers. Factory workers. Small business owners. Cambodia is a yay with a checkered kroma tied on her hairless head. A grandfather speaking French under his breath. It’s a teacher trying to do the right thing. A mother standing up for her community. Cambodia is a seller in the market, giving a discount and a smile. It’s a tour guide, beaming with pride.

Cambodia is exhilarating, inspiring and exhausting.

And, for now, Cambodia is my home.

******

Katie





School Year Wrap up

22 06 2012

The school year has just about ended with semester tests finished for everyone but the 9th and 12th graders. You would assume that semester tests would mark the end of the school year, but the students and teachers are required to be at school for a few more weeks until the official end date. The end result: the students and teachers sit around looking at each other, but no class is held. Call me old fashioned, but if I don’t have to do my job, I’m not going to come to my place of work that day. In my mind, it seems like an awful version of workforce detention (reminds me of this), in which nothing is completed or produced or fixed or….how American of me.

The truth is, the teachers really seem to like hanging out, talking with each other, gambling, and being anywhere but home. One of my coteachers teaches three days a week but is at school at least five, because he’s bored at home. And, although it’s not true for him, for many students and teachers home means work. Home means farming, cleaning, cooking, childcare. Being at school is a reprieve from these activities and many students and teachers admit preferring six hour purgatory to a “free” day at home. The point is, school’s out (basically). One school year down and only one to go. Time is flying. So with a sudden lack of schedule on my hands, I think now is the time for some productive (there it is again!) reflection on the school year.

Surprises (also known as Wait…..What?)

I think most Peace Corps volunteers have these moments when we hear something, nod our head as we always do to appear agreeable, then suddenly our jaw muscles slacken and our heads turn to the side like an inquisitive puppy as the news finally hits us, culminating with a half-stuttered, “Wait…..what?” As we adjusted to the culture the first few months, there were a lot of these moments. Once, in the first few days, as I began to ask students questions, my coteacher would just shake his head, saying, “She’s from the village, she doesn’t know.” As he tried to redirect me toward the 4-5 advanced students in the class, it was clear that once students were left behind, they weren’t given much opportunity to get back on track. Those from the “villages” often were never taught English in 7-9th grade as they should have, but now had to compete with students with three years of English under their belts. Meanwhile, teachers would ignore them because they were “from the villages.”

The other few surprises came from what I thought I was prepared for: corruption. Finding out that all teachers have money deducted from their salary for political party dues was a bit staggering. All teachers are officially card carrying Cambodian People’s Party members. Without it, they can’t be teachers. I had assumed there would be some corruption, but assumed that the students would not be directly affected. However, as I mentioned on an earlier blog, students are not only charged to take exams, but they are overcharged by a factor of ten.

Improvements

There have undoubtedly been some positive changes from the past year. First, my coteachers have improved their speaking and listening ability in English significantly. They are great students, soaking up anything I teach them, and immediately use the word, phrase, or technique so they won’t forget it. They are enthusiastic about being able to practice  their English and seem to see the value in it.

My coteachers have been able to pick up teaching techniques that require very little to no preparation. These are my bread and butter, knowing my coteachers often don’t have the time to prepare much for class. Ideally, some lesson planning would be great, but let’s keep in mind that Cambodian teachers make in a month what American teachers make in a day. Motivation is in short supply when everyone needs second and third jobs. Perhaps more importantly, the coteachers are realizing that a student centered class is a lot more fun than speaking in front of the class for two hours.

One of the things that was really important to me was to be available to students for questions, support, and opportunities to practice English. My formal “office hours” did not work, but through lots of urging, I now have students that are not so afraid of the cultural power difference between us and come sit with me and my coteachers during breaks to ask questions.

Lastly, the coteachers are starting to admit that the curriculum could be stronger. There was a strong need for them to follow the book exactly and make sure we cover everything in each chapter, whether the material is good or not. They’re beginning to be really good at knowing what is important to teach, what is important to teach differently from the book, and what is useless in this context.

Not Going to Budge

Despite the improvements, as meager as they might seem, there are certainly things that just will not change. Issues like taking money from students, allowing cheating, and poor teacher attendance are just not going anywhere. These are the realities that  I can discuss with our coteachers, but I don’t really see changing much during my tenure here. Also, getting my coteachers to sing. It’s just not happening.

Inspirations

There are lots of really positive people around that I would dare say are inspirations. First and foremost, is my counterpart and friend, Vanna. As a first year teacher, he didn’t get paid for seven months of teaching. He borrowed money, lived thriftily, and never missed a class until I took him to a training in Phnom Penh in May (even then, he left exercises for his students to have done when he came back). He lesson plans for hours a day, comes to every class, and is just a great guy to be around. If this is the new wave of young Khmer teachers, Cambodian schools will be vastly different in ten years.

Second, there is an old man who teaches Khmer. He knows English and French, and is overall a brilliant guy. More than any other factor that is inspiring is his consistancy. I think the Cambodian education system could be vastly improved with some very simple consistancy. This teacher comes to every class, arrives on time, teaches the full time, then goes home. I’ve never spotted him around the teachers’ card table, and he avoids the overly social teachers’ lounge. He doesn’t take money from students and always goes to class. For this, he is both revered and ostracized by other teachers. While some teachers invoke the group mentality as a reason not to stop earning money from tests, he shows that one person can change things.

Lastly, there is a particularly strong student in my English club whose family lives 45km from the school. Twice a month, she bikes the 45km to see her family for a day and a half, then bikes back. During the week she stays in a shared house with 26 other girls that are receiving scholarship money to finish high school. She studies hard, and talks often of university, knowing she won’t be able to go without a scholarship.

Focus for next year

What are my next steps? Mostly, I’m going to focus on cementing these improvements into the school. There is no clear indication that the improvements so far will continue after I leave, so next year will look a bit different. I will turn to more of an advising role to the teachers, making sure that they are implementing the changes that I’ve shown them. I taught a lot this year, and want to see my coteachers take the lead next year.

-Tim





One Semester Down

29 01 2012

It’s hard to believe that we’ve already been at site for almost four months. So it was a rude awakening when my coteachers told me that semester exams were coming up already. These months have been both busy and slow, productive and not, and, naturally, rewarding and frustrating.

I think my time here is significantly different from Katie’s, since I have much more structured time at the school than she has at the health center. Peace Corps requires education volunteers to be in their school for at least 16 hours a week (slave drivers, right?). It is somehow surprisingly difficult to teach much more than 22 hours at my school based on English teachers schedules. So between my English Club and public school classes, I’m at the school for about 20 hours a week in an ideal week. Once you take away holidays, community service days, coteachers not wanting to teach days, and whatever else comes up, it seems rare for me to put in a full week’s work at the public school.

When I am at school, I’ve been having a blast most days. My coteachers and I have really started to work well together, trust each other more, and have a good time while we teach. As a result, the famously stoic Khmer students are more relaxed, have more fun, and (hopefully) learn more. As I’ve slowly introduced new teaching techniques, my hesitant coteachers have seen the response from students and began to teach in the same way. This mimicry has been one very big positive sign here for me that the capacity building that we were sent here to do is happening – even on a very small level.

So this week the students have semester tests so I’m not teaching. In fact, I’m not allowed to be at the school to even observe the very tests that I wrote. Tests are always a contentious issue at my school (and probably most schools around Cambodia) due to several corruption issues. First, most public school teachers teach private classes immediately before or after school, and may choose to have a “review” session before the exam just for their private class for 4 or 5 times the regular price.

Second, at my school all the students are required to pay the teacher for each test, which is illegal in Cambodia. Early on, I recognized that making copies for all the students can be expensive so I decided not to tackle the issue since it would probably make me more enemies than friends. Recently, however, I found out that the teachers charge ten times the amount that it costs them to make copies. All told, this little test scam contributes about 20% of my coteachers’ monthly income. Not surprisingly, this makes the kids’ relationships with teachers more like customers than students. I found this out after I told my coteacher that I gave three ‘zeros’ on tests after rampant cheating in a class I was observing. He said, “The students paid for the test, so maybe we can’t give them zeros.” In spite of all the rigidity, formality, and militaristic emphasis within the Cambodian education system, it only cost twelve and a half cents for those students to completely flip the relationship of student and teacher.

But this wasn’t meant to be about corruption. A running joke in our private advanced class is how many minutes will go by before someone mentions corruption. Whether we talk about education, the environment, development, gender issues, or sports, corruption seems to come up.

Speaking of private classes, they have been going well too. I really enjoy being able to teach exactly what I want to my private students without the constraints of a book. I still have private classes four days a week. The advanced class continues to be the highlight of my week as we are able to talk in-depth about Cambodia in a structured way. I think I tend to learn more from the class than they do, but mostly they seem to be happy to be able to practice English in a relaxed setting.

With the first semester over, the thought of summer is starting to loom larger and larger over my head. I’ll need to find some work independent of the school for 3 months. There are a couple of NGOs in town that I may be able to work with; otherwise I’m going to have to get creative.

So since I have the week off, I’m taking advantage by cooking a ton, thinking about secondary projects, and spending some much needed time with my rabies-free wife.

-Tim

 





Teaching in Kampong Kdei

2 11 2011

Since Katie has talked a bit about her work at the health center, I thought I’d try to answer some of the common questions about my work at school so far. That mean it’s time for another general update post.

School entrance

School entrance and assembly grounds

My school is home to about 1,000 students from grades 7-12 and is situated 3 km from the central market area of Kampong Kdei. It is a relatively modern school and seems to have gotten its share of attention from NGOs, USAID, and the Cambodian government compared to other schools that I’ve been to in Cambodia thus far. The school is clean and well kempt, with flowers planted along the assembly grounds, plants growing from makeshift plastic bottle pots in each classroom, and two colorful maps dutifully painted by students on the outer school walls. The school is separated into four or five main buildings, separated by grades somewhat by building. The school has both a basketball court and a football field, but the field has been underwater since I arrived four weeks ago.  Behind the school buildings, students plant corn which they later sell at the market to pay for school activities. Beyond the small vegetable plot is a pond used for all the school’s water needs (irrigation, drinking water, water for bathrooms, etc) throughout the year.

Unlike many Cambodian schools, my school has lights in every classroom, some ceiling fans, a library, and a computer lab. The library was donated by an NGO and has a librarian on staff, while the computer lab was donated by another NGO as well as by Prime Minister Hun Sen. The only problem is that the school doesn’t have money for electricity, leaving the lights off, the fans still, and the twelve donated computers covered in a fine layer of dust.

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English Club classroom

Students attend school from 7-11 and 2-4 Monday through Saturday. School starts at 7 with an assembly consisting of the national anthem and some announcements over a loud speaker. Classes generally get underway at about 7:25 or so, with a fifteen minute break at 7:50. The second half of class will usually start at 8:10 depending on the teacher. This pattern follows until lunch break when all 1000 students rush out of the school gate and flood the national road with bicycles and motos, all operated by students with perfectly bright, pressed white shirts with their names printed on the left breast. At two o’clock, the tide comes back in for one final two-hour afternoon class.

Needless to say, there is a lot of movement and a lot of time off from learning at school. In any given two hour class at 7 am, there is about an hour and twenty minutes of class time. With this time, I work beside a Cambodian English teacher in relatively small classes of 40-45 students. Between classes, the teachers tend to retreat to the teachers’ lounge to discuss teaching methodologies with me and much more exciting topics with their Cambodian counterparts.

Bikes

Bikes in the courtyard

My school’s students, teachers, and administrators have all been very friendly and welcoming throughout my first month at site. They tend to hold me in very high regard (too high if you ask me) and respect what questions I’ve asked (many) and ideas I’d had (few).  Right now the primary challenge is adapting a teaching style to the book that is set forth by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports. The book does not encourage communication in a way that an introductory foreign language book in the US might, for example. It focuses heavily on reading and vocabulary, which, in my opinion, is creating high school graduates who are walking English dictionaries, but can’t form sentences since they never had to practice the skill during school. Another issue is that many lessons in the book would be incomprehensible to the students in their native Khmer, never mind in English. It should come as no surprise then that students struggle to read a passage about Windsurfing in Malta when none of the students have ever seen anyone windsurf or have the slightest clue where Malta is. In short, the book is incredibly challenging for all the wrong reasons.

World Map

World map mural, painted by a previous volunteer

So how do my coteachers and I deal with these issues? First, I’ve started an English conversation club to give students an opportunity to practice what they learn and teach them some colloquial English. So far, these have been a lot of fun and will allow some creativity that might not fit well in a regular class. Second, my coteacher and I will be introducing new teaching methods and supplemental lessons to teach students more effectively. Third, I will be working with coteachers to improve their English and encourage them to be more confident and creative in the classroom.

I’ll write more about the Cambodian classroom periodically in the future since I think it’s an interesting look into some very real differences in culture between the US and Cambodia. If you’re into reading about teaching methodologies and learning styles, you’re in for a real treat. If not, I’m sorry. Read Katie’s entries.

In addition to English class and English clubs, I’ve also been teaching some private classes with Katie at our house Monday through Thursday. It’s been a good way of getting to know people here, learning more about Cambodia and Kampong Kdei, and staying busy. We have three separate classes (kids beginner, adult beginner, and advanced) so every lesson is different. It’s also allowed me to try out new methods and lessons that I can use with my larger public classes.

-Tim





Halfway there

3 09 2011

Training continues. Luckily, the rigid schedule of the past few weeks has loosened up a bit. Two weeks ago, we had “Practicum Week,” which is a chance for volunteers to engage in more hands-on activities that mimic the kinds of projects they are likely to work on at permanent site. This means that Tim and the other education trainees were in the classroom. They taught mostly English lessons, pairing at times with other trainees and at times with Cambodian counterparts. For us health trainees, life was a little different. We observed one day at the health clinic, visited an NGO outside of Phnom Penh, conducted door-to-door surveys in our broken Khmer, learned to make the traditional weening porridge made by Cambodian mothers, and taught health-based lessons in both formal and informal settings. It was a nice break from all of the hours in the classroom– which is, of course, not a true classroom, but a small covered area outside of our teacher’s house, vulnerable to the rain and the wind that is common in rainy season.

This week we were back to classes, but with a couple more activities thrown in. For example, we had the opportunity to practice an assessment tool with the community youth. It was a great way to hear more about what they think could make their community better. Our group decided that drop-out rates were preventing people from getting jobs and making a living, and they brainstormed some possible solutions to these problems, including the creation of an informal learning club, the incorporation of more creative teaching strategies and the development of support networks to encourage students to stay in school. Unfortunately, we are not in a position to address these issues in any long-term way, so we will be passing on their suggestions to the school director and the future volunteer who will get placed here for their permanent site.

Even though we can’t address such structural-level problems in the two months we are staying in our village, we are still trying to find ways to give back. Next week, we have two days off specifically so that we can carry out community projects. The trainees in our town are contemplating ideas related to an opportunity fair, a market clean-up and education campaign, and a nutrition seminar for mothers with young kids. Parts of this week have been devoted to coming up with these project ideas and figuring out the logistics to carry them out. The challenge is of course finding sustainable projects that can be implemented in such a short time frame.

This week, we also had a session on religion that brought us the the wat. We were able to talk with the monks who live there and learn more about Buddhism– particularly the Buddhism practiced by the Cambodian people– and the lifestyle of being a monk. The wat near our house is beautiful, and it’s always a humbling and serene experience to visit, with the gentle chanting in the background and the views of the rice paddies in all directions.

Another thing that happened this week is that Tim and the education trainees traveled to the provincial town to do some teacher training exercises at the University. As time moves forward, we continue to get more practical experience that builds our confidence and skills as we transition to permanent site.

And, on the topic of permanent site, we have only one short week until we find out where our post will be. We have started to develop some preferences based on the information that has leaked about the potential sites for couples, but are trying to stay open and optimistic. We would both be happy anywhere, but are eager to be in places where our skill sets match the needs of the community and host organizations. The good thing is that we had our practice language exam this week, and based on that, we are both learning the language at the speed they expect. We were unofficially given the rating of “Novice High,” which is the level we need to reach by the end of training. We are starting to feel more and more like we are able to communicate with our host family, PC staff members and those people in the community who we interact with on a regular basis. It’s been encouraging, but there is much more to go before we will feel totally capable of successfully working in our sectors.

Other than that, the biggest news is that we finally got an Internet cafe in our town. So we should be able to update more regularly, and– gasp– finally put up some pictures. So plan to hear from us again soon.

Katie